Connect with us

Travel

What to Do When Travel Turns to Disaster

Published

on

What to Do When Travel Turns to Disaster

Laying out on a towel watching the sunset on a private beach with a special someone is what many imagine when booking and planning a relaxing vacation.

Far too often, this scenario doesn’t pan out because of unfortunate events that occur all too often during travel. Oftentimes, instead of beaches or nature hikes, it ends up being hospital bills and lost luggage.

Hopefully, this kind of scenario will never be relatable. Just like fire drills, escape routes, and other emergency procedures that many go through to prepare for the “what if” situation, it is also wise to be prepared to know what to do if a vacation takes a turn for the worst.

In the case of travel, there are three precautions that everyone should take, especially if traveling internationally.

1. Know Your Insurance

Knowing insurance policies is a good practice in general, but especially true when traveling. Traveling creates quite a few unique situations that don’t happen during a typical day. Below are just some of the different scenarios that may need insurance.

  • Driving a rental car
  • Driving in a different country
  • Signing waivers for extreme activities
  • Medical needs in a different country
  • Medical needs in a different state (out of network)

The list could continue, but the point is clear; traveling creates very unique situations that make otherwise clear resolutions murky.

In the case of driving, some insurances may not want to cover a client if the client is covered for a 2005 Honda Civic and the accident happens in a 2022 Mustang GT. The insurance agency may also hesitate if in a different country or if local laws are different.

Long story short, checking into these unique situations is wise, and it is also a good idea to have an attorney look over anything that seems questionable. The same goes for medical exams, emergency room visits, and any other scenario that gets an insurance agency involved.

2. Take Precautions With Luggage

Nearly 0.5% of all luggage gets lost between check-in and baggage claim. While this seems really low, if on a trip with four others, each with one suitcase, that is a 2.5% of having luggage disappear. Still not a huge percentage, however enough to take precautions.

There are typically four reasons that luggage gets lost, and each one has a simple precaution that can be taken.

  • Luggage Receives Incorrect Ticket – Following being scanned, every once in a while, the tag placed on the suitcase is given an incorrect destination. Simply asking to see the tag after being scanned at the desk can prevent this from happening.
  • Luggage is Taken by Wrong Person – It is very easy to grab the wrong suitcase, especially if it is a typical sized black suitcase that looks like most of the other luggage. The solution here is simple: either get unique luggage or tie a bright string around the handle of the suitcase.
  • Luggage is Lost or Misplaced During Layovers – There isn’t too much that can be done to prevent this, however keeping valuables in a carry-on can help with not losing expensive or invaluable materials such as a laptop, passport, or other legal documents. Clothes can be bought anywhere, but without a passport, you could be in real trouble.

Most of the time, the luggage will find itself back to the owner. However, as mentioned, taking these precautions will save a lot of headache and stress.

3. Get Familiar With Local Laws

This tip is especially true while traveling abroad, but could be the most essential. For example, if traveling in certain parts of the world, it may be illegal to wear a pride flag, a cross, or share a political agenda.

In other parts of the world, if someone gets pulled over in a car, the police can arrest them and they may not have a right to an attorney, speedy trial, or any other rights that many are accustomed to.

Every country is different, and knowing the laws isn’t always fun to research, but it could save you from being in a really tough situation.

By taking all of these precautions, travelers can feel a bit more secure about actually making it to the beach and enjoying the sunset.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Travel

The Most Improper Etiquette Practiced In-Flight

Packed in like sardines, airplane travelers are subject to their neighbors unruly behavior. Let’s face it some people just don’t seem to understand simple airplane etiquette. We all have our particular pet peeves when it comes to traveling and according to Expedia’s most recent etiquette survey the biggest annoyance is the rear seat kicker.  Surveying […]

Published

on

Packed in like sardines, airplane travelers are subject to their neighbors unruly behavior. Let’s face it some people just don’t seem to understand simple airplane etiquette. We all have our particular pet peeves when it comes to traveling and according to Expedia’s most recent etiquette survey the biggest annoyance is the rear seat kicker. 

Surveying over 1000 people Expedia found the biggest in-flight pet peeves that every traveler can relate to. Here are the results:

  1. The rear seat kicker
  2. Inattentive parents
  3. The aromatic passenger
  4. The audio insensitive
  5. The boozer
  6. Chatty Cathy
  7. The queue jumper
  8. Seat-back guy
  9. The armrest hog
  10. Pungent foodies
  11. The undersser
  12. The amorous
  13. The mad bladder
  14. The single and ready to mingle

 

Continue Reading

Travel

Things You Should Never Say To A Flight Attendant

Traveling can be a troublesome experience so we need to do everything we can to help make the trip more pleasant and comfortable for ourselves. On a long plane trip the Flight Attendant can be your ally in this endeavor. Flight Attendants are generally helpful and pleasant but if treated with disrespect may be disinclined to […]

Published

on

Traveling can be a troublesome experience so we need to do everything we can to help make the trip more pleasant and comfortable for ourselves. On a long plane trip the Flight Attendant can be your ally in this endeavor. Flight Attendants are generally helpful and pleasant but if treated with disrespect may be disinclined to help. 

The job of a Flight Attendant is to keep you safe and comfortable and can be stressful on the best of days, but unruly and rude passengers just make the job so much harder.  From rude statements to questions that they have no way of knowing the answer to, here are some things that you never want to say to a Flight Attendant.

“I need to use the toilet before we take off.” This is against regulations, once the seatbelt light is on you must stay put. 

“Can you lift my bag for me?” This is not the Flight Attendant’s job, when packing you should make sure your bag is not too heavy for you to lift. 

“I’ll put my phone on airplane mode in a minute.” This is a requirement and Flight Attendants must ask you to do this. Be nice and comply

“They let me the last time I flew.” Whether or not this is true your Flight Attendant won’t appreciate this ploy. Their job is to enforce the rules, and most do.

“Can you watch my kids for me?” Flight Attendants are not babysitters and you shouldn’t expect them to be. 

“Why are we delayed?” “Will I make my connection?” These are the types of questions that the Flight Attendant has no way of having the answer to. If you have a cell phone you can find those answers yourself with a handy app.

A few more handy tips on the proper treatment of your Flight Attendant. Don’t treat her like a waitress because she isn’t. Her job is to keep you safe, not to cater to your needs. And don’t call your Flight Attendant a “Stewardess”, this term is outdated and sexist. And don’t hit on her, you aren’t in a bar.

 

Continue Reading

Travel

Ecotourism is NOT Environmentally Friendly

There is a trend in travel that has picked up a lot of steam over the last few years. That trend is called Eco-Tourism. As the environment has become more important to people over the last decade – and especially so in the last couple…

Published

on

Ecotourism is a new term; something created in the last 10 years, so what does it really mean? Eco-tourism is basically capitalism’s answer to the environment and people’s growing concerns. Companies are cashing in and its becoming big business. Although the initial intent was probably good-natured, the results are usually less than favorable. The costs don’t always outweigh the means, so is ecotourism actually a good thing? Let’s find out.

Time to investigate what companies are actually trying to accomplish with their eco-tourism. The term greenwashing keeps coming up in my research and it’s a pretty interesting phenomenon. Apparently, greenwashing is an attempt to appear as being eco friendly. Seems like a pretty lame thing to be involved with, but you’d be surprised at how many large corporations actually are involved in greenwashing.

Many if not all of the major hotel chains are now putting placards in their rooms that inform guests that they respect mother nature and because of this they don’t wash the linens every night. This comes off as a great thing that a large corporation is doing. But in reality they are greenwashing us all by using the environment to service their own needs. It’s obvious to me that these companies are only doing this because it saves them an enormous amount of money and they look good in the process.

Cultures are destroyed by tourism and they can’t even profit because the major corporations suck all the money from them. Tourism only feeds off the stereotypes of a culture and the actual culture suffers and often slowly disappears. What’s left is a washed out shell of the culture and the true spirit is lost forever.  

Eco-tours are usually an environmental nightmare, by bringing in people by the busload or boatload; these eco-tours are actually harming the local surroundings.   These tourists don’t come alone, they eat, drink and consume anything in their way and what’s left is the garbage and used up Mother Nature.

Eco-tours profit from large disasters, allowing the general public to feel like they helped, when in reality all they do is scratch the surface. The tourists come to a disaster for a few days, pick up some garbage, help with some injured and then go home feeling like they made a difference. The problem is that if they really wanted to help, they would’ve just sent aid in the form of money, food or medicine,

If a company truly wanted to be involved in eco tourism responsibly, they would do these things.

Only using local products would actually benefit the environment and would help the community profit.   If ecotourism companies cared, they would limit the number of visitors to limit the impact on the environment. Educating tourists on their impact on the environment would help the cause. Allowing the local culture to be in charge and to protect their interests is the best way to help the environment.

 

Hopefully by educating people about ecotourism eventually leads to more conscious travelers and compassionate people in general.

 

Enjoy the full article at NomadicMatt

Photos courtesy of HoiAnEcoTour and GetYourGuide

Continue Reading

Trending