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7 Tips for Cooking Ribs on a Gas Grill

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There is perhaps nothing quite as good as a rack of perfect grilled ribs. However, you might only be used to seeing ribs grilled with a traditional charcoal grill. Is it possible to achieve that perfect result when cooking ribs on a gas grill? 

Here, we’ll give you 7 important tips for getting the perfect grilled ribs from your gas grill, whether you’re a barbecue beginner or a seasoned professional. 

1. Choose the Best Cut for You 

One of the most important tips for cooking ribs right is to start with the best cut for you. Pork ribs are the most popular, but beef and lamb can also be viable options that are both flavorful and easy to cook. 

However, if you do decide on pork ribs, you’ll have another decision to make: baby back, spare ribs, or St. Louis-style pork ribs. Baby back ribs are generally cheaper and faster to cook which makes them great for beginners. However, you can always experiment with the other varieties. 

2. Prep Your Meat Right 

Most ribs have what’s called “silverskin” on the back, which is like a fatty membrane that connects to the meat. If your butcher didn’t already remove this, you’ll want to take it off before you throw anything on the grill – you don’t want to eat this part. 

In addition to this, you’ll want to trim off any meat or fat that hangs from the bone side and remove any membrane from the meat side for perfect looking ribs.

Also, you might consider whether or not to pre-cook your ribs (and how you want to pre-cook them if you choose to do so). You could opt to boil them on the stove, bake them in the oven, or even put them in a slow-cooker. Purists might fine this to be controversial, but it will save you some time if you’re in a crunch. 

3. Decide on a Dry Rub

Even if you’re going to slather your ribs in sauce, a dry rub is the best way to amp up the flavor of your meat before they’re even cooked. You can make your own dry rub with seasonings you have at home or buy something pre-made from the store. 

The most important thing is to make sure your dry rub has complementary flavors to your sauce. Also important, make sure you put the dry rub on at least 2 hours before you get the ribs on the grill. With the dry rub on, ribs should be covered and refrigerated to maximize that flavor infusion. 

4. Make Sure You’ve Got the Best Setup 

Obviously, your grill makes a big difference in the quality of your ribs. Gas grills are great for making large meals for your friends and family and they’re super easy to use! They can be a bit more on the expensive side than your average charcoal grill however. 

These grills still have all of the great qualities of a gas grill at a more budget-friendly price point. If you plan on grilling for large crowds, however, make sure you get one that can hold all the food you plan on making (a big rack of ribs can take up a lot of space!) 

5. Smokey Flavor

Because you don’t get the classic charcoal flavor from a gas grill, you might find other ways of adding those smokey flavors to your ribs. 

One tested way to add smokey flavor to gas-grilled meat is with smoke bombs. To make a smoke bomb, just roll up about a half cup of damp wood chips in aluminum foil, poke some holes in the package, and place them under the grate. You can use your favorite kind of wood chips depending on the flavor you’re going for. 

6. Distribute Heat Properly 

The key to really good home-grilled ribs is to cook them low and slow. Ribs need indirect heat to cook properly, as direct heat or overheating will result in dried out or overcooked meat. Especially on a gas grill, you should try to keep your ribs as far away from direct heat as possible. 

After preheating your grill and activating your smoke bombs with some higher temperatures, you’ll want to back the heat off to 200 degrees. Let your ribs cook for 30 minutes on each side and keep the lid closed to hold in as much smoke as possible. 

7. Rest the Meat Before Serving 

It may be tempting to immediately start eating once you pull your ribs off the grill and we don’t blame you. You’ve probably started to build up an appetite smelling all those delicious barbecue smells. 

However, you’ll want to wait at least 10-15 minutes before cutting into your ribs. You might even consider covering your ribs in apple juice and tin foil while they rest to steam and tenderize them a little bit more. Then, you can optionally add some of your favorite barbecue sauce for some final touches. 

Cooking Ribs on a Gas Grill For You and Your Family

There is no meal more satisfying to make (and to eat) than homemade grilled ribs. It may take some time and effort, but when you really perfect your method, grilling ribs on a gas grill is totally worth it. 

Have fun experimenting with new cuts of meat, new spice rubs, smoke bombs, and sauces to find the perfect rack of ribs for your friends and family, or maybe just for yourself. 

Continue exploring the site for even more tips to help you becoming an at-home grilling master. 

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Food

Why Does Airplane Food Taste Bad? Science Has the Answer

Gone are the days when airplane travel was distinguished and seen as an event.  The food was amazing and the experience was second to none, but nowadays airplane travel has become just another way to travel.  Chefs used to fly on airplanes preparing 3-4 course meals and now you are lucky to get peanuts and a soda.  So why does the food on an airplane taste so bad?

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Gone are the days when airplane travel was distinguished and seen as an event.  The food was amazing and the experience was second to none, but nowadays airplane travel has become just another way to travel.  Chefs used to fly on airplanes preparing 3-4 course meals and now you are lucky to get peanuts and a soda.  So why does the food on an airplane taste so bad?
 
How come all the food on an airplane tastes horrible and why am I still eating it? If you’ve ever asked yourself that question and you have never found an answer, well don’t fret, there is research!  A new study from Cornell University has come up with an answer, and guess what? It ain’t bad cookin’.  

Science always finds the way and if you look hard enough, you are going to find an answer to any question.

Turns out, the noisy environment inside a claustrophobic airplane cabin may actually change the way food tastes.

In the study, 48 people were handed a variety of solutions that were spiked with the five basic tastes: sweet, salty, sour, bitter and umami (basically, a Japanese word for the savory flavor found in foods like bacon, tomatoes, cheese, and soy sauce). First, the testers sipped in silence, then again, while wearing headsets that played about 85 decibels of noise, designed to mimic the hum of jet engines onboard a plane.

What the researchers found: While there wasn’t that much of a change in how the salty, sour, and bitter stuff tasted, the noisy surroundings dulled the sweet taste, while intensifying the savory one—which might explain why a meal eaten on a plane will usually seem a little, well, off.

“Our study confirmed that in an environment of loud noise, our sense of taste is compromised. Interestingly, this was specific to sweet and umami tastes, with sweet taste inhibited and umami taste significantly enhanced,” said Robin Dando, assistant professor of food science. “The multisensory properties of the environment where we consume our food can alter our perception of the foods we eat.”

This isn’t the first time airlines have tried to figure out the reason behind funky in-flight food. The Fraunhofer Institute, a research institute based in Germany, did a study on why a dish that would taste just fine on the ground would taste, “so dull in the air,” as Grant Mickles, the executive chef for culinary development of Lufthansa’s LSG Sky Chefs, put it to Conde Naste Traveler

German researchers tried taste tests at both sea level and in a pressurized condition. The tests revealed that the cabin atmosphere—pressurized at 8,000 feet—combined with cool, dry cabin air numbed the taste buds (kind of like when you’ve got a bad cold). In fact, the perception of saltiness and sweetness dropped by around 30% at high altitude. Multiplying the misery: The stagnant cabin dries out the mucus membranes in the nose, thus dulling the olfactory sensors that affect taste. All of which adds up to a less-than-fine dining experience.

The good news: This research may help airlines find a way to make in-the-air meals more palatable. (That is, for flights and airlines that still offer any food at all!)

The key, according to Mickles, may be using ingredients or foods that contain a lot of umami to enhance the other flavors. He may be on to something: The folks at the Lufthansa have found that passengers guzzle as much tomato juice as beer (to the tune of about 425,000 gallons a year). Turns out, cabin pressure brings out the savory taste of the red stuff.

Good to know. Now pass the earplugs—and bring on the Bloody Marys.

 

 

Check out the full article over at Health.com

Photos Courtesy of InfinateLegroom, Thrillist

 

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The World’s Most Unique Dining Experiences

Sure, you can get a great meal anywhere. But how many times have you had a meal that sticks with you for the rest of your life? If your answer is “not enough,” then you need to check out one of these amazing global dining destinations. Food aside, the atmosphere and experience will stick with […]

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A Guide to the Best Food in San Diego

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It’s one of the first questions every person asks when they are traveling to a new city for the first time.

Where is a good place to get a bite?

Food on a trip might even be a major component that you plan an entire vacation or day around. That is especially true in big cities like San Diego, which always seem to have the biggest and best local and chain restaurants.

San Diego in beautiful California is one of the ten largest cities in the U.S. and is known for its top-notch cuisine. Everyone loves a good food tour, and San Diego is somewhere that has numerous can’t-miss places to eat you will want to read about.

Continue reading for a comprehensive list and guide to the best food in San Diego broken up by category.

Seafood is Tops in San Diego

There’s no doubt that one of the first things on anyone’s mind traveling to San Diego is to try the fish. Sitting right on the coast, and arguably the biggest city right on a coast, San Diego can offer fresh seafood that other places simply can’t. If you live in the U.S., odds are you do not live near a coast, so take advantage of this unique situation.

One of the restaurants heavy into seafood with a top reputation is George’s at the Cove. They were once voted San Diego’s top restaurant!

Another is The Fishery, with some of the best main courses you can find on any menu in town. Their fresh catches are so good that they not only serve their own supply but they are a distributor for other restaurants.

If you have gone fishing yourself and caught something tasty, or want a closer look at the catch you elect to eat, head to El Pescador Fish Market. A traditional beach hangout, they’ll cook your fish for you, or you could head on in with nothing and sit down and eat too.

A couple more seafood restaurants of note are Civico 1845 and Seafood La 57.

San Diego Pizza

Beyond fresh fish right off the ocean, San Diego is also known for its strong pizza selection. Definitely try either the pizza or seafood as some of the best food in San Diego when you head over.

Civico by the Park has wood-fired pizza and pasta that is unmatched across the city and even the state. This restaurant combines the flair of pizza with the best wine selection as well.

If you are feeling homesick on your trip, try Tribute Pizza. They feature and imitate some of the most well-known pizza places around the country, so maybe they picked one from your hometown.

Tex-Mex in San Diego

It’s all in the name as you can get the best tacos not just in town but in the solar system at Galaxy Tacos.

Some taco spots are right next to each other and competing, but that offers a great chance to try them all. Taco joints Corazon de Torta, El Comal, and Las Cuatro Milpas are all in downtown San Diego.

For more great tacos and burritos, there is also Tuetano Taqueria. They coat their special tacos with a blend of seasoning to give it a different tone and unique taste.

More Great Restaurants

While seafood, pizza, and tacos may be some of the most irresistible food around, there is still plenty more to take in on your trip to San Diego.

If sushi is your thing, try Yakitori Hano or Yakitori Taisho. Try it as the nightcap, as they are only open for dining at dinnertime. A couple of other strong sushi options are Soichi, Sushi Ota, and Sushi Tadokoro.

With a name that stands out, Crack Shack has a giant chicken out front indicating their food of choice. Fried chicken and wings like you have never had before are available there.

Everyone loves a good steak, and a food tour would not be complete without mentioning the best place to get a porterhouse or filet cut. Born and Raised takes cooking steak back to its roots.

Italian-based Civico by the Park is probably the highest-rated and most sought-after pasta establishments in the area as well as pizza. Buona Forchetta is one more pasta place that some really love.

Beyond the highly-acclaimed In and Out Burger, the best hamburger restaurant is certainly Swagyu Burger. They even have another version of their place that is Swagyu Chop Shop that combines Japanese food with American burgers.

Upscale San Diego Cuisine

One of the best things about San Diego food is that they have something for everyone. If you are looking for more of a higher-scale dining experience, look no further.

When you give this level of restaurant a try, you will also get to experience food you might have never tried before. Like at Jeune et Jolie, one of the highest-rated establishments in the city and a French masterpiece.

If you are into golf and find yourself out near the famous Torrey Pines course, there are some incredible options right near you. Try the A.R. Valentien, an eatery built right into the golf course’s lodge. Walk the same grounds Tiger Woods did when he won his 14th Major championship on a leg with a torn ACL.

The Best Grub Around

In addition to being one of the most beautiful cities to visit in the U.S., San Diego has some of the best food in the country as well. You’ll want the best grub when you are soaking up the sun, enjoying the beach, and watching some of the best sports.

There could be no better place than to head on a food tour in sunny San Diego. Now that you know the lay of the land, go out and find the best meal today.

For more articles on food, culinary, and travel, head to the rest of our blog.

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