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Don’t Get Food Poisoning While Traveling

The last thing you want to happen when you are traveling is to get extremely sick.  Many foreign restaurants don’t have the same food safety guidelines and the possibility of getting food poisoning is very high.  How do you know where to eat when you are traveling?  You are in a strange new city, the […]

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The last thing you want to happen when you are traveling is to get extremely sick.  Many foreign restaurants don’t have the same food safety guidelines and the possibility of getting food poisoning is very high.  How do you know where to eat when you are traveling?  You are in a strange new city, the sights and sounds are all over stimulating your brain and you have no clue where to eat. It can be quite daunting to be in an unfamiliar place already and then throw in the fact that there are bad restaurants everywhere, oh boy, what to do. First, don’t panic, everyone has to eat to survive so if you are in a place where other humans are living, then I think we can find you somewhere to dine.

Ask Concierge

First things first, ask the concierge at the hotel or resort you are staying. What’s a concierge you ask? The concierge is a hotel employee whose sole job is to assist the weary traveler by acting as a personal assistant. They can tell you where to eat, but be specific when you speak with them. Tell them your budget, preferences and any dietary restrictions you have. If your hotel doesn’t have a concierge, then the front desk staff should be able to help you out. I always pick the concierge’s brain the instant I get to the hotel; they are masters of their domain and know the city better than anyone.

The World Wide Web

Google it! Isn’t that what anyone says nowadays when they ask you a question. But seriously, get online and digitally ask around.  Check to see if there are any travel warnings to where you are going and if any otf those are food related.  Remember a few years ago when the bird flu broke out in asia or the mad cow disease?  These are perfect examples of how a little due diligence can do a lot of good.  I can’t be everywhere for you, so this you will have to do on your own. I prefer to hop online and go to TripAdvisor, they seem to always have good restaurant reviews and recommendations.  Yelp is now catching on in Europe so give that a try.  Most of the reviews are coming from fellow travelers so this may be a great resource. 

Research

This goes along with the World Wide Web because I’m sure this is where most of us will do the research. You could also get a travel guidebook like a Lonely Planet or Thomas Guides; they are great resources for your trip.

Pinterest is a great tool as well, many people have been where you are going and many have made Pinterest boards of their trips. It can’t hurt to do a little internet stalking on your travel destination.

Blogs, blogs and more blogs! People just like me are posting their stories and experiences all over the web, do some legwork and find out about where you are traveling. 

Locals

Who knows the town better than locals? If you want to find out the best restaurants a place has to offer, then get to communicating. Chat up some friendly locals and get the inside scoop. Use your judgment, because some people just don’t want to be bothered and it’s best to leave those locals alone.

When you are out exploring don’t be shy, talk to people and if you are pleasant and cordial, then they should help you out.

Smell it out

This one is easy folks, let your nose guide you to deliciousness. I let my nose lead the way often and its always taken good care of me. Believe me, if a restaurant smells good then the chances are the food it pretty good. Don’t be afraid to ask a local if you smell something divine. They usually will know what you are talking about and direct you in the right direction. I have very fond memories of walking down a street in Phuket, Thailand and the smells were so overpowering that my senses were overloaded. The street food was incredible there and I let my nose do the shopping.

I hope you find meals so amazing that the memories last a lifetime.

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Food

Airlines With Food You Will Actually Want To Eat

The food on airplanes have always been less than appetizing, how good can a meal be made in the tiny kitchen area 36,000 feet in the sky. Tasteless, texture free foods served in plastic trays is what you expect to receive when your flight attendant…

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The food on airplanes have always been less than appetizing, how good can a meal be made in the tiny kitchen area 36,000 feet in the sky. Tasteless, texture free foods served in plastic trays is what you expect to receive when your flight attendant serves you. Well lower your tray tables and prepare to feast! If you book your next flight with one of these airlines you will be pleasantly surprised at the repast offered. While free food on flights are a thing of the past, many airlines are attempting to earn their customer’s loyalty with meals that are not only edible, but delicious. 

In 2014 Delta started offering regional craft brews on the in-flight beverage menu. Take a Delta One flight out of JKF airport and you will be served meals by culinary superstar Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group, the food service behind NYC restaurants like Gramercy Tavern. Or fly Delta One from South America and you will enjoy a menu created by Michelle Bernstein, acclaimed for her Latin style fare. If you fly Delta in the economy class you will be served unlimited Starbucks coffee, and the only GMO-free snack box served on an American airline. 

JetBlue has partnered with chef Brad Farmerie to create a menu for their first class passengers, pursuing advanced technologies that deliver better moisture in aircraft ovens and a better understanding of taste and texture at higher altitudes. On domestic and international flights, JetBlue economy passengers are treated to an endless pantry of complimentary name brand snacks. 

Investing to become the airline of choice for international flyers, Emirates is working with chefs such as Jamie Bissonnette from Boston restaurant’s Toro and Coppa. Meals on Emirates flights will vary regionally, a flight to Japan will have meals served with authentic Japanese crockery, and on a flight to Italy meals served will include Italian favorites like ravioli and gnocchi. Economy passengers won’t enjoy the same meals as the more expensive seats, but the same attention is given to the meals designed for the menu served to the passengers in these seats. Between meals passengers can get slices of pizza, ice cream, chocolates and fruit. 

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Destinations

Lesser Known Wine Regions that you Must Visit

Everyone knows that Napa Valley or Burgundy France are wine traveler’s destinations of choice, but there are plenty of other fantastic regions.   A true wine connoisseur will tell you that the soil and environment are just as important as the type of grape used to…

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Everyone knows that Napa Valley or Burgundy France are wine traveler’s destinations of choice, but there are plenty of other fantastic regions.   A true wine connoisseur will tell you that the soil and environment are just as important as the type of grape used to make wine. The world has embraced wine making and excellent booze is now being produced all over the map. Let’s explore and see where these hidden wine gems are located and what makes them so special.

Wine producers are spreading their wings and growing some superior grapes in some unexpected places.

npr 

Kakheti, Georgia

I’m not talking about Georgia in America; I’m talking about the one that straddles Europe and Asia. This former Soviet country has excelled in producing some really interesting and delicious varieties of grapes. Wine production is nothing new to this region as archeologists have found winemaking equipment dating as far back as 6,000 BC.

One unique thing that wine makers in Georgia do is they ferment their wine in clay jars instead of the standard wooden or steel barrels. The clay gives Georgian wine a distinct sweet taste and earthy after tones.

 

Douro Valley, Portugal

Known as the birthplace of port wine, the Northernmost region in Portugal is a wine lover’s heaven. With panoramic views of the rolling hills and beautiful vineyards, wine has been produced in this region for over 2,000 years.   The golden colored hills and the divine port produced here will make this a favorite among port snobs from around the globe.

 chilled magazine

Finger Lakes Region, New York

White wines flourish in this Northern New York region, specifically Rieslings. The expansive landscape is dotted with waterfalls, 11 glacial lakes and one great lake, giving the region miles and miles of beautiful coastlines. With well over a 100 wineries, the Finger Lakes region is the largest wine-producing region East of California in the USA.

 tenerife

Tenerife, Canary Islands

Grown in rich nutrient volcanic soil, Tenerife produces exquisite reds and whites. The largest of the Canary Islands, Tenerife features grape varieties that were completely wiped out of the European mainland in a mid-1800s epidemic. The rare varieties create distinct flavor profiles and memorable aftertastes. The island views and abundant sea life compliments the island’s white wine collections.

 

Healdsburg, California

Avoid the rush that happens in Napa and head just an hour North to Healdsburg wine region. Producing similar quality wines, Healdsburg is Napa’s red headed stepchild. Born out of the need t have more wine tasting locations, Healdsburg boasts over 200 wineries and multiple award winning varieties. California has some of the best weather and soil combinations in the world, so it’s no surprise that he wine here is fantastic.

 pinterest

Door County, Wisconsin

If you are a fan of fruit wines, Door County should be your next stop. Located in the Midwest, Door County has eight wineries and is famous for their tart cherry wine. Specializing in fruit wines, Door County has plenty of grape varieties as well, so a little something for everyone.

 

Franschhoek, South Africa

Nestled just 45 short minutes from Cape Town, Franschhoek was originally known as Elephant’s Corner for the huge elephant population that roamed here. Now known for their impressive wine, the area is the best in South Africa and possibly all of Africa. Enjoy a hop-on hop-off style tour that stops at every winery and you can get a real taste of the region.

 

Enjoy these of the beaten path wine regions and taste some of their specialties, to see what all the hype is about.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Schug, NPR, chilled, New York Times, pinterest

Enjoy the full list here

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Food

Why Does Airplane Food Taste Bad? Science Has the Answer

Gone are the days when airplane travel was distinguished and seen as an event.  The food was amazing and the experience was second to none, but nowadays airplane travel has become just another way to travel.  Chefs used to fly on airplanes preparing 3-4 course meals and now you are lucky to get peanuts and a soda.  So why does the food on an airplane taste so bad?

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Gone are the days when airplane travel was distinguished and seen as an event.  The food was amazing and the experience was second to none, but nowadays airplane travel has become just another way to travel.  Chefs used to fly on airplanes preparing 3-4 course meals and now you are lucky to get peanuts and a soda.  So why does the food on an airplane taste so bad?
 
How come all the food on an airplane tastes horrible and why am I still eating it? If you’ve ever asked yourself that question and you have never found an answer, well don’t fret, there is research!  A new study from Cornell University has come up with an answer, and guess what? It ain’t bad cookin’.  

Science always finds the way and if you look hard enough, you are going to find an answer to any question.

Turns out, the noisy environment inside a claustrophobic airplane cabin may actually change the way food tastes.

In the study, 48 people were handed a variety of solutions that were spiked with the five basic tastes: sweet, salty, sour, bitter and umami (basically, a Japanese word for the savory flavor found in foods like bacon, tomatoes, cheese, and soy sauce). First, the testers sipped in silence, then again, while wearing headsets that played about 85 decibels of noise, designed to mimic the hum of jet engines onboard a plane.

What the researchers found: While there wasn’t that much of a change in how the salty, sour, and bitter stuff tasted, the noisy surroundings dulled the sweet taste, while intensifying the savory one—which might explain why a meal eaten on a plane will usually seem a little, well, off.

“Our study confirmed that in an environment of loud noise, our sense of taste is compromised. Interestingly, this was specific to sweet and umami tastes, with sweet taste inhibited and umami taste significantly enhanced,” said Robin Dando, assistant professor of food science. “The multisensory properties of the environment where we consume our food can alter our perception of the foods we eat.”

This isn’t the first time airlines have tried to figure out the reason behind funky in-flight food. The Fraunhofer Institute, a research institute based in Germany, did a study on why a dish that would taste just fine on the ground would taste, “so dull in the air,” as Grant Mickles, the executive chef for culinary development of Lufthansa’s LSG Sky Chefs, put it to Conde Naste Traveler

German researchers tried taste tests at both sea level and in a pressurized condition. The tests revealed that the cabin atmosphere—pressurized at 8,000 feet—combined with cool, dry cabin air numbed the taste buds (kind of like when you’ve got a bad cold). In fact, the perception of saltiness and sweetness dropped by around 30% at high altitude. Multiplying the misery: The stagnant cabin dries out the mucus membranes in the nose, thus dulling the olfactory sensors that affect taste. All of which adds up to a less-than-fine dining experience.

The good news: This research may help airlines find a way to make in-the-air meals more palatable. (That is, for flights and airlines that still offer any food at all!)

The key, according to Mickles, may be using ingredients or foods that contain a lot of umami to enhance the other flavors. He may be on to something: The folks at the Lufthansa have found that passengers guzzle as much tomato juice as beer (to the tune of about 425,000 gallons a year). Turns out, cabin pressure brings out the savory taste of the red stuff.

Good to know. Now pass the earplugs—and bring on the Bloody Marys.

 

 

Check out the full article over at Health.com

Photos Courtesy of InfinateLegroom, Thrillist

 

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