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Worst Rush Hour Traffic in World

Everyone hates traffic and it just seems to keep getting worse. No matter how much construction you city does, it never is enough. Global populations are growing and traffic is just another byproduct of growth. You may want to travel to get away from traffic, but be careful what you wish for, as traffic abroad may be much worse than where you currently live.  If you are trying to avoid congestion and traffic woes, you may want to skip these 15 destinations, even though they may be excellent vacation spots.

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Everyone hates traffic and it just seems to keep getting worse. No matter how much construction you city does, it never is enough. Global populations are growing and traffic is just another byproduct of growth. You may want to travel to get away from traffic, but be careful what you wish for, as traffic abroad may be much worse than where you currently live.

In fact, only one US city ranks among the top 15 cities with the worst rush hour traffic and that of course is Los Angeles, coming in at number 14. Wow, how can that be, I live in Los Angeles and I thought that was the worst traffic, until I traveled to Asia… talk about gridlock.

If you are trying to avoid congestion and gridlock woes, you may want to skip these 15 destinations, even though they may be excellent vacation spots.

Let’s see who has the worst rush hour traffic in the world according to GPS manufacturer TomTom.

 

Beijing, China

Expect China to be on this list a lot with over a billion people currently residing there. Beijing comes in at number 15 and the traffic there is insane. If you plan to travel to this Chinese Mecca, plan on traffic being a major part of your trip. Try to book a hotel close to the city center so you won’t have far to travel to any attraction.

 

Los Angeles, California

LA tops all of the United States with the worst gridlock. Not a big shocker to residents as everyone drives, no body carpools and the public transportation is a joke. Traffic will continue to grow here with California’s liberal policies and decreased transportation budget.

 

Shenzhen, China

Another Chinese city on the list, Shenzhen is a manufacturing hotspot, so not too many people travel here for vacation, but the amount of workers here is astonishing.

 

Shijiazhuang, China

With a population of over 10 million, this metropolis southwest of Beijing is smaller than Los Angeles but has much worse gridlock, with the average commute taking over an hour. Stick to the north and southern beaches in China to stay away from traffic as hard as that is.

 

Guangzhou, China

This city in China is known for its bustling port and being a maritime hub of all china’s manufacturing. Most products heading to the United States originates from this port, so you can imagine just how busy this city can be. A very high density of 18-wheelers makes traffic here a true nightmare.

 

 

Santiago, Chile

South America’s worst rush hour traffic is located in Santiago Chile. The country’s capital city is an extremely busy hub of commerce and since it has so many winding and curving streets, traffic is at a snail’s pace.

 

Zhuhai, China

Back to the Chinese travel nightmare, Zhuhai is close but still not the worst traffic in Asia. Called the Chinese Riviera, Zhuhai is China’s premier travel destination. The best beaches are located here and the city is close to Macau, Asia’s version of Las Vegas,

 

St. Petersburg, Russia

Russia breaks in to the list with St. Petersburg. Russia’s second largest city has long had trouble with transportation, as the infrastructure here is seriously dilapidated.   Poor streets and bridges make traveling here terrible.

 

Istanbul, Turkey

Istanbul has always had bad traffic going back ages. Ancient cities like this one often aren’t prepared for modern driving and the amount of cars in today’s world.

 

Chonqing, China

Topping the worst driving in all of China is a feat not to be proud of. Chonqing is terribly designed making driving awful and the public transportation is non-existent.

 

Moscow, Russia

Moscow has bad roads, bad drivers and too many people, so of course traffic is terrible. The city is too cool to not visit, so suck it up and check it out.

 

Jakarta, Indonesia

The island nation of Indonesia has awfully designed infrastructure, so the highways are jammed packed. Stay in the smaller beach towns to avoid the headaches.

 

Bucharest, Romania

Bucharest is in the category of ancient cities with old roads and narrow side streets. Driving here is so bad, you are best to leave it up to the cabbies, and they will hook you up.

 

Mexico City, Mexico

Just too many people in a giant sprawl city describe Mexico City perfectly. The city is a radical experience, so hopefully the traffic won’t keep you away.

 

Bangkok, Thailand

The top city again is Bangkok, Thailand. The worst traffic in the world has been located in this Southeast Asian city for three years in a row. Overpopulation, huge tourist numbers and poor infrastructure makes Bangkok a bad spot to drive.

 

Good luck out there and hopefully traffic doesn’t ruin your vacation.

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Travel

Choosing the Best Airplane Seat

The great debate… window or aisle and which airplane seat is best? It’s a question that has been asked multiple times and the discussion keeps raging on.   Is there a scientific answer or is it more about personal preference? I’m here to get to the…

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The great debate… window or aisle and which airplane seat is best? It’s a question that has been asked multiple times and the discussion keeps raging on.   Is there a scientific answer or is it more about personal preference? I’m here to get to the bottom of this question and maybe finally find out, which seat on an airplane is truly the best.

It’s no surprise that the airlines continue to move the seats closer and closer, slowly eroding our legroom and lowering our comfort levels. Have you ever sat on an airplane and have the windows not line up with your seat?   That’s because the seats have been moved to make room for more rows and more passengers per flight.

Of course this debate doesn’t include first class, because there is no bad seat in first. If you can afford first class or get upgraded, thank your lucky stars that you don’t have to make this Sofie’s choice. Enjoy that free champagne up there; us peasants will be fighting over the armrest like a bunch of wild animals.  I’m not sure that people that fly first class have any idea what its like choosing and airplane seat.

The only real truth that has been answered is that the middle seat is by far the worst and should be your last choice. Only a real savage would decide to sit in the middle seat if others were available. This choice has too many variables to make it an acceptable choice.

Window or Aisle?

Statistically, the aisle seat is the most sought out when booking, and the window is a safe second choice. Most frequent travelers prefer the aisle for access to the restroom and the fact that they don’t have to climb over someone. Safety from blood clots is another reason aisle people love their seats. It allows you to get up and stretch your legs multiple times and at your own convenience.  These reasons are why the aisle is statistically the number one airplane seat picked.

Window enthusiasts will advocate for their choice by saying you can sleep easier and are bothered less. They also boast about having control of the window shade, which is a power move for sure.   Overnight flights make people chose the window first, because it allows them to lean on the side of the plane as a headrest, which makes sleeping much easier.

 

Worst seats on Airplane

Its no secret that the middle seat is the redheaded stepchild of airplane seats. Nobody wants it and only chose them when they have no other choice. Last resort middle seats are your punishment for booking your travel late.   You don’t get your own anything in the middle except of coarse tray table.

Sitting in the middle makes you continuously jockey for the armrests and legroom with your row mates.  Why chose this airplane seat?  I can only think that you wish to sit with your loved one, but I always have my wife sit on the aisle as I sit in the window.  Only if someone tries to sit in between us does my wife move to the middle.

I never want to sit in the first or last rows, always a bad choice. The last row almost never reclines and the first row never allows you to keep your personal belongings with you.   Airlines tend to jam the last row in there so it may also have slightly less legroom, and on airplanes, every centimeter counts. The first row or bulkhead is a red herring; it looks like first class but is actually not convenient at all. The flight attendant will make you keep all your stuff in the overhead compartment instead of next to you, where you need it.

The seats in front of the emergency rows also doesn’t recline, so steer clear of those awful seats.

Exit door seats are also way over-rated, they boast that they have extra legroom, but they also don’t recline. In my experience, reclining is way more important than a little extra legroom. If you are extra tall however, these seats are your best bet.

For the love of all that is holy, stay away from the bathroom. You may think that these are good seats because they have easy access. WRONG! You will smell everything that comes out of people and there is no escaping some stinky poop. Beware of false conveniences.

 

Night or Day

If you are flying at night, the overwhelming majority of people prefer the window. This is obviously for sleeping purposes and not being bothered by your row mates.

During daytime flights, the aisle is the preferred seat. These allow people to have better access to the restroom and have more room overall to adjust during the flight.

  

Which seat is best for you is totally a personal opinion. I know that I almost exclusively sit in the window seat, but that’s my opinion. I can tell you that sitting in the middle seat is a fate I don’t wish upon anyone. They should just get rid of all middle seats and the world may actually be a better place to live. Imagine how much happier we would be if the middle seat never existed in the first place.

 

 

Photos Courtesy of thedailybeast, mrandmrsromance, dailymail, youtube

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Travel

Traveling Creates Personal Growth

I often get asked why I want to leave home and travel. Won’t I miss everyone and everything? Won’t I get lonely? What am I running away from? We all have our reasons for traveling – wanderlust, the love of a new culture, a desire…

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Why do I travel, is something that gets asked of me often and for a while I didn’t have an answer.  It actually took some solo travel for me to have the time to ponder that great question.  I reflected on what I was doing and why was I there.  The answer is different for everyone, so my reasons will certainly be different from yours and so on.  The simple answer to why we travel is for personal growth, but what does that mean?

Every person has their reason to travel… exploration, freeing your soul, personal growth, trying to forget something, searching for answers, boredom or do you just want to see the world.  I’ve always believed that travel is particular to each person.   For some travel can be backpacking around the world, while travel for others can be driving 100 miles to the next major city, all that matters is your personal growth.  

The cool thing is that travel means different things to different people and my definition has no bearing on yours.  The key is that you find your own reasons to travel and just do it like nike.

No travel book is written for you unless you are the author.  I can’t live your life for you, but I can give you some useful advice and if you follow it that is on you.  I hope you do travel and I hope you figure out why you travel, because I have and its changed my life.

Travel is a collection of moving parts that you hope gel together to create a memorable and favorable experience. That collection of moving parts is how you will experience a trip and hopefully help you become a better person.  Is this improving your personal growth?

 

The world moves so fast nowadays and with modern conveniences we lose sight of many of the important aspects, like personal connections and understanding how other people think. 

Life moves fast and it helps to slow down on occasion and appreciate how amazing everything is.  The synergy of our planet is pretty cool and if you don’t spend time to check it out, after awhile it will be too late.

I’ve been moving pretty fast recently, married, new job, and the one constant in my life is my need for wanderlust.  A constant need to better myself, my situation and my happiness.  i’ve learned that life won’t slow down for you, if you want change, you have to actively work on it.

Is there personal growth?

Now is the time that you must decide why you travel or if you don’t, why should I.  I’m tired of hearing the same excuses for why people constantly put off traveling and these excuses never stop.  If you want to experience life and not just get by, travel and see the world.  This will hopefully open up your eyes to how other people think and live, by doing so, you will be a better person.   This is your homework assignment: seriously try and think about why you travel or should travel.  Try and think about the last trip you took and how it affected your life, your mind and your world view.  Hopefully you were positively affected by your trip and you found soe inner peace along the way, cause I know I did. 

 

Check out the full article on NomadicMatt

Photo courtesy of 1elemental and Lifehacker

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Mexico Travel Deals: Win 20 Years’ Worth of Free Caribbean Luxury Vacations

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One of the most affected industries due to the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic is tourism. To offset the heavy financial loss, a few places like Mexico and those in the Caribbean recently reopened their borders to tourists.

Mexico, along with other places in the Caribbean, is a favorite pre-COVID-19 vacation destination for a number of tourists all around the world. So, to enliven the tourism industry once again, they created the trending hashtag, #Come2MexicanCaribbean (and its Spanish equivalent, #VenAlCaribeMexicanoX2) to promote post-COVID-19 tourism in these areas.

To further strengthen this campaign, would-be tourists are encouraged to remember their memorable visits of the Mexican Caribbean region and the different things they might like to do there in the future.

The said contest awards a lucky tourist with a 20 years’ worth of yearly vacation to the Mexican Caribbean area combined with a 5-night, all-inclusive stay in any of the 4- or 5-star coastal resorts there.

Contest Sponsors

The competition is sponsored by several tourist hotspots including those of Cancun, Isla Cozumel, Isla Mujeres, Playa del Carmen, Riviera Maya, and Tulum. It is also backed by top hospitality developer Atelier Group and the Quintana Roo Tourism Board.

How to Join the Competition

If you are interested in the said contest, here are several guidelines for you to follow:

  •  Contestants must be 18 years old;
  • You should be a resident of any of the following countries:
  1. US,
  2. Canada,
  3. Mexico,
  4. Guatemala,
  5. Colombia,
  6. Peru,
  7. Chile,
  8. Brazil, and
  9. Argentina;
  • You must have either a TikTok or Instagram account (or both);
  • Post a video or a photo that features your favorite Mexican Caribbean beach vacation/s;
  •  Include the specific tags, #Come2MexicanCaribbean and @Come2MexicanCaribbean;
  • Follow the said initiative’s TikTok or Instagram profiles, @Come2MexicanCaribbean;
  • Tag their accounts on either of the platforms mentioned; and
  • The post that garners the most likes, plays, comments, and shares gets to be the winner of the competition.

The contest begins on 9 November and ends on 27 November 2020. Entrants should be able to post their entries within the given period.

You can also read the full terms and conditions of the said competition here. You may also visit en.come2mexicancaribbean.com for more information regarding the contest.

Summary

Mexico’s tourism industry comprises 8.5% of the nation’s overall GDP. Last year, an approximate of 24 million tourists visited the North American nation. Despite reopening its borders to visitors in July, the country’s roster of resorts and hotels still find it difficult to alleviate the effects of the lengthy lockdown imposed by the government earlier this year. The rapid increase in COVID-19 transmission is yet to slow down and the government aims to find more effective ways to flatten the curve.

The #Come2MexicanCaribbean aims to remind travellers of the country’s long-held tourist industry and the enticing spots that used to be go-to vacation areas in the region. It is their hope that by doing this initiative, the height of tourism will come alive again once everything goes back to normal.

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